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Heating Factors to Consider

Heating Factors to Consider

boiler roomWe are examining a variety of ways in which to heat your home, on behalf of your St Louis Heating Installation near Ladue MO.  As many would agree, air quality is often an issue that homeowners overlook when planning their heating and air conditioning systems. Comfort, fuel-efficiency, and cost are often the factors that take top priority and though they are not to be discounted, it would be wise to factor in the air quality in your St Louis Heating near Ladue as well.  When looking at differences in Heating options for your home or office, it is also overlooked by many that there are more choices than just the type of fuel that a system uses. The above are both factors for consideration when deciding upon which heating style best suites your home in St Louis near Ladue MO.

There are other things to be considered as well as energy efficiency and type of fuel being used, according to your St Louis Heating Repair near Ladue.  “There are also differences in the heating and distribution processes. The right choice in a heating system for your home will improve comfort and even help keep you and your family healthier.”  So, that leads us to deciding between different heating styles.

Let’s finish up by contemplating the differences in furnaces and boilers.  According to our research done on behalf of your St Louis Heating and Cooling Sales near Ladue, “Both furnaces and boilers rely on gas or oil to create heat but their method of delivery varies a great deal.” A furnace heats air and then blows it into ductwork that runs throughout your home; this is the most common existing method of heating in St Louis homes. In this system, air is blown out of registers or diffusers, creating warmer areas in some spots. “The hot air rises to the ceiling and remains there once the furnace is no longer blowing.”  In the next post, we will pick up on the differences in this style and the use of boilers.

HVAC History Facts

HVAC History Facts

typewriterWriting here on behalf of your HVAC service and sales company near Maryland Heights, I like to cover topics of interest that can helpful, but also sometimes just interesting and informative.  So, today, we will be going over some good old fashioned history.  The history of HVAC, to be exact, and we will likely be discussing parts of it over the course of the next several posts.  In 1758, according to your Bridgeton MO HVAC sales people, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley discovered that all liquid evaporation had a cooling effect.  Using alcohol, and other volatile liquids, they determined that these things could evaporate faster than water and could actually cool down an object enough to freeze water.

In 1820, according to your HVAC Maintenance near Maryland Heights, Michael Faraday worked on and discovered the same thing when he compressed and liquefied ammonia.  In the 1830’s sometime, Dr. John Gorrie built an ice making machine that used compression to create buckets full of ice and then blew air over them.  He did not have the finances he needed to move forward with his ideas and so all was dissolved.  Still in the 1800’s, 1881, to be exact, President Garfield was shot and naval engineers did all that they could to keep him comfortable by inventing and building a cooling box.  It was full of soaking wet cloth and blew hot air overhead, keeping cool air to the ground.  The amount of ice used was incessant and so it proved to be inefficient and President Garfield passed away.

More takes place in the 1900’s, when in 1902, “Willis Carrier invents the Apparatus for Treating Air for the Sackett-Wilhelms Lithographing and Publishing Co. in Brooklyn, N.Y. The machine blows air over cold coils to control room temperature and humidity, keeping paper from wrinkling and ink aligned. Finding that other factories want to get in on the cooling action, Carrier establishes the Carrier Air Conditioning Company of America.”  This, according to your commercial HVAC sales and service company in Bridgeton MO, marks the first actual air conditioner, though much research had been done to lead to that point.

Commercial Kitchen Layout: Refrigerators Freezers and Ice Machine

Commercial Kitchen Layout: Refrigerators Freezers and Ice Machine

commercial restaurant equipment installation in Saint LouisAmerican Services restaurant equipment installation in St. Louis knows that no professional kitchen layout would be complete without commercial refrigeration equipment and commercial ice machines. There are a few steps to follow when positioning your refrigerators, freezers and ice machines, allow a couple of inches of clearance on the sides and back for proper air flow. Below are some alternative layout suggestions;

– Keep refrigeration and cooking equipment as far apart as possible.
To gain the most energy efficiency out of your equipment, the best method is to place your refrigeration units at the end of a cook line, or the coolest part of the kitchen. Keep in mind, every time the door opens on a commercial refrigerator or freezer, cold air rushes out and hot air rushes in. This could cause a problem on a hot cook line.

– Put ice machines in a separate area, the hotter the surrounding environment (air) the less ice it will produce. Care should be taken when placing the ice machine, choose a temperature controlled area if possible. The location of the ice machine must be close enough to the main kitchen area so that workers don’t have to go that far to get ice.

– Put the blast chiller at the end of the food line. A blast chiller will quickly cool down hot food so that the food can then be transferred to a refrigerator or freezer. Rapidly refrigerating or freezing pre-cooked foods is actually an energy efficient way to take the strain off your refrigerator. The blast chiller machine would be optimally placed at the end of the cook line so hot leftovers can be chilled quickly. When using a blast chiller at the end of the night, the performance of the blast chiller should be energy efficient since cooking equipment is presumably off at this point.